Review: Nerve by Jeanne Ryan

Dial Books, Jeanne Ryan, review 0 Comments 14th January, 2019

Nerve by Jeanne Ryan
Published by Dial Books on 2012
Genres: Action & Adventure, Computers, General, New Experience, Peer Pressure, Social Issues, Young Adult
Pages: 294
Goodreads

For fans of The Hunger Games A high-stakes online game of dares turns deadly When Vee is picked to be a player in NERVE, an anonymous game of dares broadcast live online, she discovers that the game knows her. They tempt her with prizes taken from her ThisIsMe page and team her up with the perfect boy, sizzling-hot Ian. At first it's exhilarating--Vee and Ian's fans cheer them on to riskier dares with higher stakes. But the game takes a twisted turn when they're directed to a secret location with five other players for the Grand Prize round. Suddenly they're playing all or nothing, with their lives on the line. Just how far will Vee go before she loses NERVE? Debut author Jeanne Ryan delivers an un-putdownable suspense thriller.

my thoughts

It was fun in the beginning with the smaller dares and the interactions between Vee and her friends from school. But once I got to the middle of the book I just had a hard time continuing. And that is because the final dare takes up the entire second half of the book. It felt so drawn out. There is nothing wrong with a book being 250 pages people! Don’t draw things out just to get a high page count please. And the people involved in the final dare were so unreal it just made it all unbelievable.

I felt bad for Tommy. He’s introduced as kind of a sidekick for Vee when she first gets into these dares, and then he’s just tossed to the wayside in favor of some random stranger as her new sidekick. And then things happen and yeah, the drama was just taken too far in my opinion. I know teenagers are angsty and great at drama, but this was just too much.

The last thing that bothered me was all the mentions towards an incident that happened before the story, but you’re only given little bits and pieces about it, but it’s used as an excuse for why some things are the way they are in the present during the story. The incident isn’t explained in any kind of detail until the very end, which was frustrating.

Nerve could have been great for me, and maybe if I’d read it before my great reading slump I might have enjoyed it more. It does carry a great message though. We put a lot of ourselves out there on the internet, and you don’t always know who is seeing that. All in all, it might be a worthwhile read just for that, to help make people aware of privacy issues.

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